Boys who grow up around novels 'earn much more as adults'

Children who had access to books could expect a higher mature income than those who grew up whatsoever, according to new research by economists at the University of Padua.

Children who had access to books could expect a higher mature income than those who grew up with few or none whatsoever, according to new research.

Analyzing 6,000 men born in nine nations around Europe in the interval between 1020 and 1956, they looked at whether kids dwelt, from the age of 10, in houses with fewer than 10 novels, one shelf of books, a bookcase featuring up to 100 volumes, two bookcases, or more than two bookcases.

Their findings, which were published in the Economic Journal, demonstrated that a guy’s lifetime earnings could increase .

Several theories were put forward to explain the outcomes.

"Possibly books matter because they encourage children to read more, and reading can have positive effects on school performance," it was proposed.

"Instead, a house filled with books signifies advantageous socio-economic states."

"A sizeable fraction of 50 Europeans grew up in a home with less than a shelf of (non-school) books," corresponding author Guglielmo Weber said. "The returns to education for people in such homes were much lower than for the more fortunate ones who had more direct access to books.

"In this sense, we claim that novels – like diamonds – are eternally."