A brief history of the Pin-Code, which guarantees what you bought online is delivered

Madras managed the southern region and Bombay, the remainder while Bengal catered to all of the northern and eastern parts of British Empire.

How six digits removed confusion over incorrect spelling, similar names, and different languages.

On April 1, 1774, India got its three first postal circles: Bombay Bengal and Madras. As the date indicates, this was one of the first things that the British did once they started to colonize the country.

Madras managed the southern region and Bombay, the rest while Bengal catered to all of the northern and eastern parts of British Empire.

There were eight Postal Circles: Bombay, Bengal, Bihar and Orissa, Assam, Central, East Punjab, Madras and Uttar Pradesh. But even so, there was confusion within the address of a letter, given spelling mistakes, areas with similar-sounding names, and so on.

It was to streamline the stream of the tremendous quantity of mail whizzing around the nation that the Postal Index Number – aka PIN Code – system to identify each post office in the country with a single number was introduced on August 15, 1972.

The first digit in the six-digit number signaled the region. The next identifies the state or union territory, the fourth and third zoom in on the mail-sorting district within each state, and also the fifth and sixth identify the particular post-office whose jurisdiction the address falls under.

The very first modern postal codes were introduced in Ukraine, which was then underneath the Soviet Union in 1932, and then be left in 1939. It was embraced in the United Kingdom below the name of “postcode” and the United States, as the “zip code.”

While e-mail and other kinds of digital communication have cut on the number of letters written and posted, e-commerce and home delivery of purchased products have ensured that the PIN Code stays as significant as ever.

Pin codes USSR Ukraine Postal code system postal system